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#HKTRP #49 – A conversation with experienced physiotherapist Helen Real (1/2)

Today on the podcast, we’re going to talk to Helen Real, an experienced physio who works for a company called posture plus which specializes in sports physiotherapy. We’re going to talk to her from an ultra perspective, i.e. ask her about common injuries that she sees ultra runners suffer from and what runners can do to take proactive action against potential future injury. So, let me welcome Helen Real to the show.
Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this podcast are Helen’s personal opinion only
We’re going to divide the podcast into two parts. In the first part, we’ll focus on the importance of maintaining a good posture plus what can one do before ultras and after ultras to recover quickly and prevent potential injury. In the second part of the podcast, we’ll talk about common running injuries and treatment.

Part 1:
Let me welcome Helen Real to the show and also congratulate her! She got married a couple of weeks back. Also, we’ll start off with the usual trivia questions for Helen
Trivia:
  • Helen, could you please give us an introduction of yourself
  • How did she get into physiotherapy
  • Her realm of expertise. What kind of injuries does she deal with
  • Is she a runner herself?
  • How long has she been running for?
  • How long has she been in HK for and what’s her favorite trail?
  • What’s her best “running” accomplishment in her opinion?
  • Does she have any role models in Hong Kong or outside of Hong Kong?
Posture and ultra running:
  • Why is it important to have a good posture
  • Should one work on a good posture before getting into running or can it be a “refine as you run” experience
  • Does the posture change for sprinters / ultramarathoners ?
  • How will one know that they have a good posture
  • Any views on shoes like Hokas? What would be a good pair of shoes in her opinion?
  • How important is stretching before running and what’s the science behind it?
  • How important is post run stretching and why is that important (if it is)

To subscribe to this podcast, please go to iTunes and search for The Hong Kong Trail Rockers Podcast (https://itunes.apple.com/hk/podcast/hong-kong-trail-rockers-podcast!/id994423166)

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#HKTRP #48 – Talking to Mr. Sin (one of the first Hong Kongers to complete the RTP Desert Series)

Today on the podcast, we’ve got Mr. Sin Shui Fuk.
Most people will know Mr Sin as one of the first local Hongkongers to have completed the four Deserts Race Series – four 250-kilometre races across deserts around the world. Mr Sin suffers from Hepatitis B and has used running as a tool to help him beat the disease as much as possible. Also, during his illness, he noticed that whilst women would devote a lot of love and care towards their other halves, women received much less attention when they were sick, as he saw while caring for his wife when she was hospitalised. Mr Sin thinks that women and men should not only have equal opportunities in society, but there should be reciprocity in terms of the expression and sharing of love and care, especially during times of illness.
Also, as a co-host, let me welcome Agnes Cheng who is an active trail runner in Hong Kong. She is Mr. Sin’s campaign manager.
Introducing Agnes. It’s time for our 3 trivia questions:
  • What’s your favorite trail in Hong Kong and why?
  • What’s your best accomplishment in the field of running / hiking and why?
  • Who are your role models if any?
Questions for Mr. Sin
  • Self introduction
  • Background questions
    • How old is he now?
    • When did he get into hiking and how did it evolve?
    • When did it occur to him to do the 4 Deserts Race Series?
    • What were his family’s thoughts on his idea? Did they object to it?
    • Why did he want to do it? And, why this challenge?
  • Talk about ups and downs of the Desert Series
  • Talk about future goals
  • What’s the best place to reach him?
    • https://www.facebook.com/walktocare/

To subscribe to this podcast, please go to iTunes and search for The Hong Kong Trail Rockers Podcast (https://itunes.apple.com/hk/podcast/hong-kong-trail-rockers-podcast!/id994423166)

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#HKTRP #47 – Talking to Nutrition Specialist Katia Kucher and Nic Tinworth aka “Tinny” from Trail running Hong Kong (Part 3 / 3)

Part 3/3:

Today, our guest is Katia Kutcher, the owner of d.BeFit (www.dbefit.com), is a NASM certified personal trainer, a NASM Sports Nutrition Specialist. She is also TRX certified. She did the Translantau 100 in 2015 and finished 3rd in her category (21.19).

In the first part of the podcast, we spoke about Trail Running and Nutrition, in the second part of the podcast, we spoke about Post-Run Recovery and its importance. In the final port of the podcast, we are joined by Nic Tinworth (aka “Tinny”) who is an active blogger and founder of the 3800+ member strong Trail Running HK Page on Facebook.

Big thank you to Nic Tinworth for helping produce this 3-part podcast. Excerpts in the show notes are from Katia’s articles in her newsletter and on her website which we highly recommend you check out. We also have excerpts from Nic Tinworth’s blog. Link is below. You should definitely check that out for some knowledge bombs. Please leave comments on his blog, we would love some feedback.


  • Mental aspects of running (Topics we will try to touch open)

 

      • My piece on it: http://hktrailrunner.blogspot.hk/2014/06/mind-over-body-central-governor-theory.html
      • Timothy Noakes – Central Governor Theory
      • Is it your body or your mind limiting race day performance?
      • What is the Governor? How do you tame it? Why is it important?
      • Obviously not wishing to belittle the physiological demands of a race, or try to say that the mind is more important, the theory as Noakes explains it is that successful racing is a balance between being physically prepared, emotionally ready (motivated, with a good tolerance for pain) and the self-preservation. The exact combination of these factors is what leads to how hard you are able to push during a race.
      • Matt Fitzgerald – Train the brain and the rest will follow.
      • Your race performance is ultimately determined by how fast your mind/brain feels your body can go, and that, in turn, is determined primarily by how fast you have proved to your mind/brain that you can go in training.
      • What part does confidence play? Getting to the start line knowing you have done what you can to meet your race goal.
      • Six-time Ironman champion Dave Scott: I knew going into each race that my confidence would help to support a fast day and a successful outcome. After transitioning from coaching myself to coaching others, I knew the best place to start was to establish and build upon an athlete’s confidence level. The technical stuff is secondary if you don’t have the inner-drive, mental edge and physical foundation to take the leap.
      • teleoanticipation,” which Fitzgerald describes as “knowing intuitively just how much to hold back at the beginning of a maximal running effort to complete the effort without anything left in the tank, yet also without any decline in performance.” I was making a conscious evaluation of my abilities as a runner on that given day with what Fitzgerald calls “subconscious brain calculation.” Essentially, I was convincing my brain to allow me to sustain my goal pace for the entire duration of the race.
      • Andy DuBois (Mile27.com.au) – The role of motivation!

 

  • One study(1) timed how long people could hold a wall sit for. Without fail when they were offered money they could hold the sit position for longer. The more money they were offered the longer they could hold the position for. How can muscle fatigue be the reason for the length of their wall sit when they were able to hold for longer when offered more money? Motivation must be a factor. The mind was able to override the fatigue from the legs in order to obtain something valuable, in this case money, and the more money offered the greater the motivation.

 

      • 1. The more highly motivated you are the harder you can push yourself. Think about why you are doing the race and why it’s important to you. Remember all the hard work you have put in.
      • 2. If you feel like you are running well then your rate of psychological perceived exertion is lower and the brain allows you to work harder. Connect in with how you are feeling and flood your brain with as many positive thoughts as possible. Even if you don’t feel that great find something positive to think about and it will feel easier and you may even be able to run faster. Practise doing this in training so come race day it comes easy to you.

 

  • 3. Mentally resting before a big event.

 

    • Resist running fatigue
    • Use cross-training as brain training
    • Mastering the art of pacing
    • Learning to run “in the zone”
    • Outsmarting injuries
    • Fuel the brain for maximum performance

Big thank you to Katia and Nic.


To subscribe to this podcast, please go to iTunes and search for The Hong Kong Trail Rockers Podcast (https://itunes.apple.com/hk/podcast/hong-kong-trail-rockers-podcast!/id994423166)

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#HKTRP #46 – Talking to Nutrition Specialist Katia Kucher (Part 2 / 3)

Part 2/3:

Today, our guest is Katia Kutcher, the owner of d.BeFit (www.dbefit.com), is a NASM certified personal trainer, a NASM Sports Nutrition Specialist. She is also TRX certified. She did the Translantau 100 in 2015 and finished 3rd in her category (21.19).

In the first part of the podcast, we spoke about Trail Running and Nutrition, in this part of the podcast, we are going to talk about Post-Run Recovery and its importance.

Big thank you to Nic Tinworth for helping produce this 3-part podcast. Excerpts in the show notes are from Katia’s articles in her newsletter and on her website which we highly recommend you check out.


 

  • Recovery post running

 

    • “A lot of runners will experience different symptoms once the running season is over; inflammation and soreness, ruptured muscle fibre, stress hormone elevation and disruption, a suppressed immune system, connective tissue wear and tear, fatigue, irritability, weight loss, increased resting heart rate, loss of sleep and heavy legs” – from her newsletter
      • Talk about that.
    • Tips for optimal recovery
      • 1.Know the rules:
        • -Our physical capacity has limits
        • -Life stress is body stress
        • -High volume, year round training is unsustainable
        • -Regular, prolonged rest is required
        • -Limit the # of races
      • 2. Don’t Run:
        • -For every 15km raced you need to take one day off. If you used the race as training then this rule might not apply, it depends on how hard you pushed and the elevation as well.
      • 3.Commit to recovery:
        • -Your joints and muscles might feel ok after a few days rest, but our mechanical systems are rarely the most stressed. It’s our internal systems such as the nervous, endocrine and metabolic systems that are highly affected by running an ultra marathon, and those systems have invisible wounds that are a lot greater than those in our muscles and legs. Share your commitment to recovery with friends and family to make sure you stick to your goals.
      • 4.Refuel:
        • -The average calories burned during an ultra marathon is between 600-1,000 calories/hr. One of the symptoms after an ultra marathon is a loss of appetite. It is important to refuel early and often. It actually takes days even weeks to replace all the nutrients lost during an ultra.
      • -Listen to your body. Your body requires a lot of calories for both healing and repair. It is important to refuel with a healthy diet to make sure you provide your body with all the essential nutrients.
        • -Post-race nutrition requirement breakdown;
        • 100gr of protein/day
        • Avoid simple carbs (can increase inflammation) focus on eating healthy carbs and limit simple sugars.
        • Hydration is crucial for days following the race. Proper hydration will help dispose of metabolic waste, digestion, and repair of the whole body.
        • Eat healthy fats, which helps in nutrient absorption.
        • Listen to your cravings.
      • 5.Keep moving:
        • Active recovery is very important post-race to help with restoring motion to the muscles, joints, and everything else. While you should take a break from running, you need to keep moving. Include stretching, walking, yoga, massage. Key areas to stretch include; hip flexors, hamstrings, quadriceps, calfs, shins, back and trunk flexion rotation and extension. After a few days, cross training can be very beneficial to get the blood flowing to the leg muscles and speed up recovery. Include short sessions of swimming, cycling, walking, or elliptical training, but keep it low impact.
      • 6. Sleep:
        • The primary purpose of sleep is to rest, restore, and repair the nervous system. The average recommendation is 8hrs of sleep per night, nothing below 6hrs. For the first week after running an ultra marathon, you should add 1hr of sleep/ day. Whether it is a nap or going to bed an hour earlier, that extra rest will make a huge difference.
      • 7. Find different ways to keep busy:
        • After training for hours and hours a week, recovery can be a challenge when we are used to running for hours regularly. Spend more time with family and friends, enjoy life outside of running for a while, before you know it the next racing season will be right around the corner!
      • 8. Turn off your brain:
        • Often our brain takes over our body, it can be challenging to avoid the temptation to train or sign up for another race because a friend is asking you to join, or seeing some running mates still running or racing. Limit your time on social media for a bit in order to get a real brake.
      • 9. Assess you body:
        • When you feel like it’s time to start running again focus on your running mechanics. After a long race and taking a break you have to reassess  your running form to make sure everything is in line. You might have to include a few physio sessions to make sure everything is released and uninjured.
      • 10. Start running:
        • When you feel ready to go again, ease back into training. Take it as a reverse tapering, don’t start with speedwork or long distance, build up the mileage, speed and strength.

We continue in Part 3 where we will talk about Mental Strategies for Running with Nic Tinworth and Katia


To subscribe to this podcast, please go to iTunes and search for The Hong Kong Trail Rockers Podcast (https://itunes.apple.com/hk/podcast/hong-kong-trail-rockers-podcast!/id994423166)

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#HKTRP #45 – Talking to Nutrition Specialist Katia Kucher (Part 1 / 3)

Part 1/3:

Today, our guest is Katia Kutcher, the owner of d.BeFit (www.dbefit.com), is a NASM certified personal trainer, a NASM Sports Nutrition Specialist. She is also TRX certified. She did the Translantau 100 in 2015 and finished 3rd in her category (21.19).

We’re going to cover three big topics with her in this three part podcast.

  1. Nutrition and running
  2. Why post-run recovery is so important
  3. Mental aspects of running

I also have with me a co-host in Part 3. Everyone in HK probably knows him already! An avid trail runner, author of the running  blog hktrailrunner.blogspot.com and the guy behind the Trail Running HK facebook group (3,800 members strong!) Big thank you to Nic for helping produce this 3-part podcast. Excerpts in the show notes are from Katia’s articles in her newsletter and on her website which we highly recommend you check out.


 

Trivia questions for Katia:

 

  • Favorite trail in Hong Kong and why?
  • Best accomplishment in the field of running
  • Does she have any influencers / mentors / role models

Questions for Katia:

  • Introduce herself – who is she? What’s her expertise in her own words?

 

  • Nutrition and running:

 

      • Correlation between running and weight loss
        • Some runners lose a lot of weight and they even look thin to the point where they look unhealthy. How do you know how much to run and what your weight needs to be?
        • Should people start to run longer and further *after* they have reduced their weight to a certain amount?
      • Effect of eating and drinking on running
        • How much water should one consume on a hot summer day and how do you calculate that?
        • Is there a correlation between the color of one’s pee vs hydration/dehydration? There seem to be differing schools of thought on this
      • Best foods for endurance running and why
        • We’re going to talk about Macro/Micro nutrients
          • What is a macronutrient and what’s a micronutrient?
      • Probiotics
        • What is probiotic?
        • “The way scientists measure the “will to live”, is by doing a very interesting experiment; they take a young rat away from his mother, throw him in a pool of water, with no way out and see how long it takes him to stop swimming in circles and give up. This is a test to measure how long it takes before “giving up on life”. Don’t worry, they don’t let the rat die. A few years ago, they did the same test, and the rats that had been consuming probiotics, suffered less anxiety and despair after being separated from their mother, and they didn’t give up as quickly on their “will to live”.
          • How do they know that this simply wasn’t a result of the rat getting used to this type of torture?
          • What about probiotics makes this the case? What’s in it?
          • Nutrition during racing: How much should I eat? What should I eat? When should I eat? What to do if something goes wrong?

 

  • Practical advice for race nutrition

 

    • Depression and Anxiety: Our brain and belly are linked together
      • Talk about this. What about oily / chilly food?
        • 1.Fill up on fiber.
        • 2.Maintain a healthy weight.
        • 3. Be careful with antibiotics which kill good and bad gut bacteria.
        • 4.Get plenty of sleep which helps the body produce the hormones melatonin and prolactin, which help improve bacteria balance.
        • 5. Eat fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, kimchi and sauerkraut
    • Benefits of supplements for trail runners to help with overall health, build up the immune system, digestive system and muscle recovery etc..
      • What kind of supplements should one consume?
    • 6 Nutrition Habits that Impair our Training and Performance.
    • Binging at Night:
    • Many people train in the morning, then get so busy during the day that they don’t eat enough. By nighttime, they are starving. Break the bad habit, have a good breakfast, carry healthy satisfying foods like nuts, bananas, apples. Try not to have a late dinner, after you finish eating, wait 15 mins to see if you’re still hungry.
    • Eating Huge Portions: Long training sessions will make you very hungry, but our body can’t process a huge amount of calories at once. When we eat too much at one time, we risk storing it as fat. We’re better off eating smaller portions followed by a healthy snack if we’re still hungry.
    • Eating too many carbs: Yes we do need to eat carbs. But by eating too many starches like pasta or rice, we skip eating more nutrient rich foods like protein, veggies, legumes and fruits. Just make sure that your plate is nicely balanced.
    • Post Run Beer or Alcohol: It very easy to use post run socializing beer meets, but a couple of beers quickly add up in calories. Instead of finishing your training near a bar, switch to a coffee shop (stay away from the sugary coffee drinks) and enjoy a nice coffee or sparkling water.
    • Too Many Energy Bars: Energy bars can be high in calories, full of preservatives and sugar. When buying energy bars, look closely at the ingredients, or make your own bars. Look for bars with a shorter ingredient list, low in sugar. Save bars for times when you really need them, after a tough workout, or when you don’t have access to real food. Eating real food like bananas, almonds etc.. will provide more antioxidants and nutrients.
    • Train Hard, Eat More: After a long run, treating yourself to burgers and fries, beer, ice cream on a regular basis will undo all the hard work. Don’t view training as an excuse to eat whatever you want after, just have a healthy regular meal. Enjoy your run or training. When we look at exercise as a positive, fun experience, we are more likely to eat less and choose healthier post-training foods.
    • Healthy fats
      • too much sugar is bad for us (why?) but what about during a race for that little boost towards the end of a 100km

We continue the discussion in Part 2 of the podcast where we will talk about Post run Recovery.


To subscribe to this podcast, please go to iTunes and search for The Hong Kong Trail Rockers Podcast (https://itunes.apple.com/hk/podcast/hong-kong-trail-rockers-podcast!/id994423166)